Nike of samrothrace

The largest public sculpture based on Nike appears in a prominent position atop the massive Pennsylvania State Memorial at Gettysburg National Military Park in Pennsylvania. An Impressive Piece of Art The Nike statue is a marble statue, the Greek goddess of Victory, who is depicted as a winged woman standing on the prow of a ship, braced against strong winds of the sea.

It is considered one of Nike of samrothrace Louvre's greatest treasures, and since the late 19th century it has been displayed in the most dramatic fashion, at the head of the sweeping Daru staircase.

Description[ edit ] The context of the Winged Victory of Samothrace, discovered inis controversial, with proposals ranging from the Battle of Salamis in BC to the Battle of Actium in 31 BC as the event being celebrated.

This monument was probably an ex-voto offered by the people of Rhodes in commemoration of a naval victory in the early second century BC. Despite its significant damage and incompleteness, the Victory is held to be one of the great surviving masterpieces of sculpture from the Hellenistic Period, and from the entire Greco-Roman era.

The type of ship depicted, the gray marble used to make the bow and the mention of the word 'Rhodios' at the base of the statue hints at its Rhodian origin. Today, the original Nike of Samothrace stands on the grand staircase Nike of samrothrace of the Louvre Museum in Paris.

This monument was erected in a grotto on a hill overlooking the Sanctuary of the Great Gods on the northern Aegean island of Samothrace.

The base was dismantled block by block and placed in the workshop. However, Nike of samrothrace believe that it was an offering made to the gods by the Macedonian general Demetrius I Poliorcetes after his naval victory at Cyprus but then this would date the statue to an even earlier period, sometime between B.

The statue and its base clearly belong together, and were obviously designed together as a single monument by a sculptor of great virtuosity, even genius.

Moreover, a slight downward slope in the horizontal surface on which the wings rested meant that their weight was borne by the body, so that two metal dowels were all it took to hold them in place.

Rendered in grey and white Thasian and Parian marblethe figure originally formed part of the Samothrace temple complex dedicated to the Great gods, Megaloi Theoi. David's gaze and pose shows where he is seeing his adversary Goliath and his awareness of the moment — but it is rare in ancient art.

Janson has pointed out [1] that unlike earlier Greek or Near Eastern sculptures, Nike creates a deliberate relationship to the imaginary space around the goddess. The Greeks represented concepts such as Peace, Fortune, Vengeance, and Justice as goddesses at a very early date.

Most of the remains were sent to Pariswhere the reconstructed statue was installed in the Louvre in on the landing of the great Daru Stairway. The stylistic portrayal of the wings is a source of scholarly discussion, as the feather pattern resembles neither the wings of birds in nature nor wings in Greek art.

The colossal work was placed in a rock niche that had been dug into a hill; it overlooked the theater of the Sanctuary of the Great Gods. This remarkably ingenious solution meant that the sculptor was able to use cantilevering in a large marble work, although the technique was normally only possible in bronze.

Sculpture of Nike of Samothrace

The different degree of finishing of the sides has led scholars to think that it was intended to be seen from three-quarters on the left.

A presentation mixing grandeur and theatricality This exceptional monument was unearthed in on the small island of Samothrace in the northwest Aegean. In the treatment of the tunic-sometimes brushing against the body, sometimes billowing in the wind-the sculptor has been remarkably skillful in creating visual effects.

The Hellenistic period saw numerous naval battles between the kingdoms inherited by the successors of Alexander the Great as they fought for control of the Aegean Sea. The art historian H. The prow was reconstructed from marble debris at the site by Champoiseau in and assembled in situ before being shipped to Paris.

Saint-Gaudens depicts Nike with her right arm raised while it is thought the original Nike was not making such gesture. Rendered in grey and white Thasian and Parian marblethe figure originally formed part of the Samothrace temple complex dedicated to the Great gods, Megaloi Theoi.

A partial inscription on the base of the statue includes the word "Rhodios" Rhodianindicating that the statue was commissioned to celebrate a naval victory by Rhodesat that time the most powerful maritime state in the Aegean which in itself would date the statue to BC at the earliest.

When the statue is fixed into position in the cavity, its center of gravity is directly over the short back part, weighing down on it with 2.

Nike of Samothrace

This holds the front of the prow up in the air. The course of the oar boxes at the back consists of two adjacent blocks, the deck of three.The Winged Victory of Samothrace, also called the Nike of Samothrace, is a 2nd-century BC marble sculpture of the Greek goddess Nike (Victory).

The winged goddess of Victory standing on the prow of a ship overlooked the Sanctuary of the Great Gods on the island of Samothrace. In Nike bc) and the Nike of Samothrace. The latter, discovered on Samothrace in and now in the Louvre Museum, Paris, was probably erected by Rhodians about bc to commemorate a.

Nike (Victory) of Samothrace (reduced size) Modern plaster replica (given to the Wilcox by the KU Department of French and Italian) at a about 1/2 scale of a Greek original of ca. BCE (original is just over 8 ft tall).

According to the small metal oval in the back, the cast was purchased from the Caproni Bros. cast company of Boston probably in The latest Tweets from ニケ (@Nike_Samothrace). 好きなものクラシック。ピアノ。宝塚。中島みゆき。Michael Jackson。栗本薫。サブアカ@nike。. These, like the well-known “Nike of Samothrace”, are masterful displays of vigorous action and emotion—triumph, fury, despair—and the effect is achieved by exaggeration of anatomical detail and features and by a shrewd use of the rendering of hair and drapery to heighten the mood.

The Winged Victory of Samothrace, also called the Nike of Samothrace, is a 2nd-century BC marble sculpture of the Greek goddess Nike (Victory). The winged goddess of Victory standing on the prow of a ship overlooked the Sanctuary of the Great Gods on the island of Samothrace.

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Nike of samrothrace
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